What we’re reading online

A rolling feed of our favourite literary resources.

Source: The MillionsPublished on 2019-09-18
Author Olivia Gatwood‘s debut collection of poems, Life of the Party, was a hot ticket at last year’s Frankfurt Book Fair, and was published by Random House last month. In addition to being an accomplished poet both in spoken word and on the page, Gatwood is also a Title IX Compliant educator in sexual assault prevention and recovery, and her new collection interrogates issu...
 
Source: Nathan BransfordPublished on 2019-09-18
Yesterday I blogged about what makes a good mystery in a novel. So who did it best? Who created some of the best mysteries of all?

Note that I’m not necessarily asking for your favorite mystery novel! Some great mysteries have been crafted outside of that genre, whether it was wondering if Snape could be trusted in the Harry Potter series or whether Ahab would get his neme...
 
Source: Nathan BransfordPublished on 2019-09-18
Yesterday I blogged about what makes a good mystery in a novel. So who did it best? Who created some of the best mysteries of all?

Note that I’m not necessarily asking for your favorite mystery novel! Some great mysteries have been crafted outside of that genre, whether it was wondering if Snape could be trusted in the Harry Potter series or whether Ahab would get his neme...
 
Source: Entropy MagazinePublished on 2019-09-18
Stevie Edwards is the author of two poetry collections, Good Grief  (Write Bloody) and Humanly (Small Doggies), as well as a recent chapbook Sadness Workshop (Button Poetry). She holds a poetry M.F.A. from Cornell and is a Ph.D. candidate in creative writing at Univ. of North Texas. Her poems appear in Crazyhorse, Redivider, West Branch, Gulf Coast, Pleiades, and Ninth Letter. Her article &ld...
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-09-18
Naomi Fry writes about the dark comedy “Party Down,” which is streaming on Hulu, starring Jane Lynch, Adam Scott, and Lizzy Caplan as struggling actors working in the catering business in L.A.
 
Source: NYT BooksPublished on 2019-09-18
“The Second Founding,” by the historian Eric Foner, argues that the radical promise of the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments — all passed after the Civil War — remains unfulfilled today.
 
Source: Entropy MagazinePublished on 2019-09-18
WOVEN is an Entropy series and dedicated safe space for essays by persons who engage with #MeToo, sexual assault and harassment, and #DomesticViolence, as well as their intersections with mental illness, substance addiction, and legal failures and remedies. We believe you. If selected for the series, we want to provide the editorial and human support such that our conversation continues long after...
 
Source: LA Review of BooksPublished on 2019-09-18
SHORTLY AFTER the publication of Janet Fitch’s The Revolution of Marina M. — which traces a young poet’s journey through the chaos of Russia in the late 1910s — she and I spoke about that sweeping, riveting work of novelistic imagination and painstaking research. I tried to avoid asking Fitch about her future projects, although I knew that Marina’s revolution was far ...
 
Source: The RumpusPublished on 2019-09-18
Matt Hartman writes on how the narrative of the phenomenal disabled athlete narrows our vision of disabled needs and ability at The Outline.

Devorah Heitner looks at the bodies we inherit and how to live with them for Longreads.

Over at Catapult, Eden Robins discovers the true nature of exploration while traveling with marine biologists.



Here at The...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-09-18
It’s day three of the National Book Foundation’s longlist announcements; today they’ve announced the list for the 2019 National Book Award in Poetry. Publishers submitted a total of 245 books to be considered by judges Jos Charles, John Evans, Vievee Francis, Cathy Park Hong, and Mark Wunderlich. All ten of the longlisted books this year come from independent publishers. (Ad whil...
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-09-18
Maddie Dai’s Daily Cartoon considers what is and isn’t cancel culture.
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-09-18
The New Yorker announces the contenders in the 2019 National Book Awards category of Poetry.
 
Source: New Yorker / Books & FictionPublished on 2019-09-18
The New Yorker announces the contenders in the 2019 National Book Awards category of Poetry.
 
Source: NYT BooksPublished on 2019-09-18
“The Dutch House,” a novel whose creation she compared to burning a cake, is coming out soon. Let’s change the subject.
 
Source: The RumpusPublished on 2019-09-18
“I’m ruining my life,” laments Mel, a character in Carley Moore’s debut novel The Not Wives. “By wanting to fuck guys and by never having enough money.”

Ruining? Well, nothing wrong with lusting after the chef in the restaurant where you bartend, as long as your partner has agreed to try an open relationship. And being broke isn’t Mel’s f...
 
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