What we’re reading online

A rolling feed of our favourite literary resources.

Source: Guardian BooksPublished on 2019-02-18
A timely history shows how confusion and dispute plagued the Irish border long before Brexit

Numbering 208, there are more border crossings between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland than there are between the European Union and the countries to its east, which amount to a mere 137. That troubled border in the north-east of the island of Ireland runs for 310 miles along the mi...
 
Source: The RumpusPublished on 2019-02-18
The poems in Secure Your Own Mask by Shaindel Beers place a great deal of emphasis on domestic violence and the problematic, if evolving, male figure. However, these poems also arrive triumphant, placing equal emphasis on the beautiful: nature, escape via the circus, gentle moments with animals and a growing son. Such a collection walks a delicate line, but it is an important one to walk, and expl...
 
Source: Guardian BooksPublished on 2019-02-18
The latest book by The End of Eddy author is a bludgeoning critique of France’s treatment of its working classSince the publication of The End of Eddy in 2014, Édouard Louis has assumed for himself the voice of the voiceless in his native France. His autobiographical novel, published when he was only 22, sold nearly half a million copies, was translated into 20 languages, and was hail...
 
Source: Guardian BooksPublished on 2019-02-18
As we mark LGBT history month, the novelist selects some classic, personal novels and true accounts of the battle for civil rights

It’s a rite of passage for every young gay man to read Edmund White’s A Boy’s Own Story, the classic tale of a teenager coming to terms with his homosexuality. I first read it when I was 15 years old, hiding the book at the back of my wardr...
 
Source: BibliokleptPublished on 2019-02-18
February, 18th.–A walk, yesterday afternoon, with the children; a bright, and rather cold day, breezy from the north and westward. There has been a good deal of soaking rain lately, and it has, in great measure, cleared hills and plains of snow, only it may be seen lying in spots, and on each side of stone-walls, in a pretty broad streak. The grass is brown and withered, and yet, s...
 
Source: Crooked TimberPublished on 2019-02-18
I’m reading two books called Wit’s End at the same time, which deserves a prize, or I am committing Yvor Winter’s Imitative Fallacy. The first is witzend [amazon associates link]. The second is Wit’s End: What Wit Is, How It Works, and Why We Need It[amazon], by James Geary.

In order: witzend was Wally Wood’s baby. Wally Wood [wikipedia], if you don&rsqu...
 
Source: The Digital ReaderPublished on 2019-02-18
Here are a few stories to read this Monday morning.

I've already forgotten these 23 "unforgettable " last sentences. Here's a great argument for raising taxes on corporations: "Amazon Will Pay a Whopping $0 in Federal Taxes on $11.2 Billion Profits". This round-up post has all you need to know about ebook distributors. This 2019 literary calendar gives authors 98 different chances to ...
 
Source: The Digital ReaderPublished on 2019-02-18
Remember last year when everyone was losing their shit over evil profiteering prisons banning print books or forcing inmates to only buy from approved sources?

I pointed out at the time that the prisons had banned print books as a way to stop drug smuggling via chemicals sprayed on the paper. Now it would appear the issue is not unique to the US.

The BBC reports that a dru...
 
Source: LitReactorPublished on 2019-02-18
Different books stay with you for different reasons. Not all those reasons are good.

Column by Gabino Iglesias

Image via Daniel G Remember that book you read a decade ago and still hate? Remember that book that was with you while you were going through a tough time? What about that book that introduced you to something you fell in love with? Or that novel you read tha...
 
Source: BibliokleptPublished on 2019-02-17
Roberto Bolaño died at the young age of 50 in 2003, just as his work was beginning to gain a wider audience and broader critical acclaim. It wasn’t until after his death that his work was published in English. Just a few months after Bolaño died, New Directions published By Night in Chile in translation by Chris Andrews. A year later, they published Andrews&rsqu...
 
Source: The Digital ReaderPublished on 2019-02-17
Today I would like to bring something that I made for Facebook and introduce it on the blog.

Over the past few months I have been making fun graphics to post on Facebook (and Instagram, and Pinterest). Some of my graphics are new takes on existing memes (like the Roomba meme or the guy wakes up at his funeral meme) but others are conversation starters.

Today I'd like t...
 
Source: LA Review of BooksPublished on 2019-02-17
AS WE BARREL into an uncertain future, it feels like everything is spinning out of control. Governments around the world are locked in self-destructive gridlock. Secretive hedge funds warp the economy with their pet algorithms. Technology is transforming our media diets, our love lives, our geopolitics, and even our DNA. The old rules no longer apply. It’s a cliché because it’s ...
 
Source: The Digital ReaderPublished on 2019-02-17
When Amazon rolled out the 5.10.3 firmware update earlier this week, all they told us officially was that it was new and free. (Usually the changelog at least mentions "bug fixes and performance enhancements", but not this time.) But according to users over at MobileRead, the update did actually enhance performance:

I just updated my Oasis 2 and the only thing i am noticing ...
 
Source: Entropy MagazinePublished on 2019-02-17
Can You Ever Forgive Me? | dir. Marielle Heller | USA

It’s 3:30 AM in Manhattan. A somewhat dowdy, middle-aged woman is sipping scotch to get through the late shift at her shitty cubicle job. After an unknowing (yet vehement) “fuck off” that makes its way to her boss, she is promptly fired. She lives in an equally shitty one bedroom apartment, as evidenced by the drie...
 
Source: LA Review of BooksPublished on 2019-02-17
WHEN I LEFT ACADEMIA for the so-called “real world,” the first job I landed was at a restaurant consulting agency. Naïvely, I thought I knew a thing or two about food. Hadn’t all those years studying orgiastic turtle feasting rituals meant anything? Working at the agency changed all of that. I learned to think of burgers in terms of “carriers” and “proteins...
 
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