What we’re reading online

A rolling feed of our favourite literary resources.

Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-06-27
Sean Lavery writes on the changing traditions surrounding wedding vows, and speaks to the relationship expert Esther Perel and the professional vow writer Charanna Alexander Jean.
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-06-27
Katy Waldman reviews “Fleishman Is in Trouble,” the début novel of Taffy Brodesser-Akner.
 
Source: New Yorker / Books & FictionPublished on 2019-06-27
Katy Waldman reviews “Fleishman Is in Trouble,” the début novel of Taffy Brodesser-Akner.
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-06-27
Another month of books, another month of book covers. In the summer, all the books start looking a little too similar for my taste: the shelves become awash in sunsets, large hats, and soft colors, all the covers bidding for inclusion in beach bags or the emotional equivalent. None of the below book covers fit into that category—each one is weird and bold and perfectly suited to the book at ...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-06-27
I moved to Paris in February 1971, a few weeks after my 24th birthday. I had been writing poetry for some time by then, and the road to my initial meeting with Beckett began with Jacques Dupin, a poet whose work I had been translating since my undergraduate days in New York. He and I became close friends in Paris, and because Jacques worked as director of publications at the Galerie Maeght, I met ...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-06-27
“No animals appear to have been harmed in the making of these poems.” That’s David Orr writing about Mary Oliver’s work in a review of O Magazine’s spring 2011 poetry issue. Readers of Oliver know otherwise: some animals in her poems come to very great harm. Crows dream of murdering an owl, a caught fish flails and sucks at “the burning amazement of the air,&rdq...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-06-27
In any debate over education, someone invariably mentions Rabelais and Montaigne: Rabelais, who argued via his creations Gargantua and Pantagruel that a school should be an “abyss of knowledge,” and Montaigne, who preferred a man with a “well-made head” rather than a “well-filled” one. These two concepts, laid out here in opposition to one another, are the two o...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-06-27
Most of us are able to recognize the names of great artists such as Shakespeare, Rembrandt, or Bach, and probably also the names of great scientists like Newton, Einstein, and Planck. But how many have heard of great mathematicians such as Leonhard Euler, Srinivasa Ramanujan, or Georg Cantor? This is despite the fact that their contribution to our understanding and appreciation of the world is no ...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-06-27
I wonder how many memories start with a date. Certainly for me, the days my children were born, the day I was married, my birthday, my siblings’ birthdays, my parents’, the day my mother died—these dates are indelible. But the ordinary days become indelible only in retrospect, in the recalling of the events of the day over and over, in the retelling of the story of what you felt ...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-06-27
Located in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, Bluestockings is a collectively owned and operated bookstore with a long history.

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What’s your bookstore’s origin story?
Bluestockings Women’s Bookstore was founded in 1999 by Kathryn Welsh. In 2003, it was sold to Brooke Lehman, who reopened it as a collectively-owned-and-operated bookstore, with a more in...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-06-27
This week on The Maris Review, Maris is joined by Lauren Mechling, whose debut adult novel How Could She is out now.



Lauren Mechling: When I became a mother, that created some unforeseen tensions with some of my closest friends, and it also created wonderful relationships with people I wouldn’t have been friends with. But it’s something you can’t pre...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-06-27
In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, New York Magazine senior correspondent Irin Carmon (co-author of Notorious RBG) and novelist and Boston University law professor Jay Wexler (author of Tuttle in the Balance) talk about news coverage and fictional depictions of the Supreme Court. How partisan is the Court becoming? Why use humor to write fiction about the nine Justices? Ruth Bader...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-06-27
On November 2, 1950, Hugh Gaitskell, Chancellor of the Exchequer for Britain’s Labour government, accused his opponents in the Conservative Party of “what the late George Orwell in his book, which honourable members may or may not have read, entitled ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ called ‘doublespeak.’” Orwell’s final novel had been out for 17 months and Gai...
 
Source: Guardian BooksPublished on 2019-06-27
Dark memories haunt these acutely observed portraits of love, loneliness and everyday ennui in Belfast

They hook you in hard, the people whose lives fill Wendy Erskine’s debut collection, but you wouldn’t want to trade places with any of them. To borrow from the balding man in a grey jacket, who makes a brief appearance commenting on the music of a fictional Belfast rocker i...
 
Source: The RumpusPublished on 2019-06-27
A-Wa is a vocal ensemble, a band, a dream, an elegy, a small mobile collective of rhapsodes, three sisters of Yemenite Jewish origin, singing primarily in Arabic. The sisters are Tair Haim, who is the lead singer, and primary composer, and her sisters Liron and Tagel, who sing harmonies. Tair is voluble and warm and confident. Tagel is somewhat quiet and literary. Liron is funny, a little raucous ...
 
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