Round up the second

kitten
Everything is going to be alright. Here. Have a kitten.

Some useful beta feedback for Pressmonkey threw us into a little frenzy as we worked to make the tool even better. Inevitable boasting about that to come, naturally. That meant that my time for monitoring the blogging and writing worlds was even more squeezed than usual.

Here, though, are some of my favourite bookmarked articles from the week – mostly sent out yesterday afternoon in a crazy crazy tweet-fest!

Once again this week rejection is in the air. But, hey, for writers rejection is always in the air!

Having overcome gatekeepers and their screening policies, perhaps my next worry should be whether the showers of cash that inevitably follow will corrupt my art. Trust me. I’ll risk it.

Colin Dickey’s piece on the relationship between money and writing dates back a month or so, but it was only recently picked up by the ever reliable Passive Voice.

Also catching my eye – Elizabeth Span Craig on social media time savers (ahem – if you’re looking for a way of integrating Twitter into your WordPress publishing process, please give Pressmonkey a try!). Anne R Allen on reasons that writers should (and should not) consider blogging. A nicely misanthropic column in Litreactor by Ed Sikov on who writers hate (pretty much everyone).

Unless you’re living accidentally or intentionally at the bottom of a deep dark hole, it’s all but impossible to ignore the news at the moment. The question as to how writers should negotiate the various dumpster fires smouldering right now is inevitably on people’s minds. Last week, the brilliantly foul-mouthed Check Wendig responded to critics who called on him to shut up about politics. This week, Kristine Rusch offered some strategies for the writer (just shutting up not being the main thrust of her advice either, thankfully).

Finally, speaking of bookish responses to general awfulness, Electric Literature and The Digital Reader both published pictures that suggested real life and dystopia might be on a collision course.

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