What we’re reading online

A rolling feed of our favourite literary resources.

Source: BibliokleptPublished on 2019-09-18
Projection Enclave, 2018 by Toyin Ojih Odutola (b. 1985)

 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-09-18
Richard Brody writes about the film adaptation of Donna Tartt’s book “The Goldfinch,” starring Oakes Fegley, Ansel Elgort, and Nicole Kidman and directed by John Crowley.
 
Source: NYT BooksPublished on 2019-09-18
“Dunce,” by Mary Ruefle, confronts the extraordinary yet inescapable fact that all of us die.
 
Source: The MillionsPublished on 2019-09-18
Books can open up new worlds to readers, but according to biochemist Michael D. Shaw, we’re missing out when it comes to reading about the grandeur of space. But thanks to advances being made with augmented reality, which provides immersive ways to learn about space, readers can access a much more enhanced experience. “A book that augments reality and immerses readers in a story by phy...
 
Source: NYT BooksPublished on 2019-09-18
He nurtured an empire of influential comic strips, including “Cathy,” “Doonesbury,” “Calvin and Hobbes,” “The Boondocks” and “For Better or for Worse.”
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-09-18
Another reason to be pro-Warren: she supports (and is supported by) poets. Turns out that one of the poets up for the National Book Award this year, Camonghne Felix, is also the Director of Surrogates & Strategic Communications at Elizabeth Warren for President.

Felix has been longlisted for the National Book Award for her collection Build Yourself a Boat, which Morgan Parker descr...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-09-18
Pretty much anyone should be able to finish Lucy Ellmann’s one-sentence, 1,034-page novel Ducks, Newburyport, the author told the Washington Post, unless you are a baby.

“One English reviewer claimed only 2 percent of people (besides himself) would understand the book,” she said. “My own estimation is that everyone can understand it, give or take a few babies.&r...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-09-18
Unseen, the first audio comic aimed at blind audiences, begins with a welcome from creator Chad Allen.

“We’re living in a challenging time, and as a person with a disability, my perspective is often excluded from the conversation,” Allen, who is himself blind, says. “I hope you see the world a little differently after reading Unseen.”

Allen was...
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-09-18
Rebecca Mead writes about the former Prime Minister David Cameron’s account of the role that he played in Brexit and recent British history in his memoir “For the Record.”
 
Source: The RumpusPublished on 2019-09-18
The Rumpus Book Club chats with Ayşe Papatya Bucak about her debut collection, The Trojan War Museum: And Other Stories (W. W. Norton & Company, August 2019), drawing on fairy tales and mythology for inspiration, writing from the third position of being both American and Turkish, and more.

This is an edited transcript of the book club discussion. Every month The Rumpus Bo...
 
Source: LA Review of BooksPublished on 2019-09-18
PARASITE, BONG JOON-HO’S LATEST movie, joins recent films such as I, Daniel Blake, Shoplifters, and Burning in its attempt to dramatize the wealth gap. The parasites in question are a family of four who insinuate their way into an affluent family’s mansion as English tutor, art therapist, driver, and housekeeper, a scheme that requires ousting those already in the positions. Bong not o...
 
Source: NYT BooksPublished on 2019-09-18
The big business of encouraging the words.
 
Source: Guardian BooksPublished on 2019-09-18
Long-term partner of Margaret Atwood had dementia but continued to travel with her on book tour for The Testaments

The Canadian author and conservationist Graeme Gibson has died at the age of 85. Gibson was the long-term partner of Margaret Atwood, and was with the novelist while she toured to promote her new book, The Testaments.

Atwood said in a statement this afternoon tha...
 
Source: Guardian BooksPublished on 2019-09-18
Stella Count researchers say gender parity reached by most publications

Researchers have praised most Australian publications for reaching gender parity in their book review sections last year.

Of published book reviews in Australia in 2018 49% were for books written by women, according to research published on Thursday by the Stella Count.

Continue reading...
 
Source: The Digital ReaderPublished on 2019-09-18
Typography is one of the lesser-known modern art forms , but just how much do you know about it?

The following infographic is going to tell you more about typography than the average person would want to know, but in my opinion, it's rather short on detail (kidding).

Enjoy!

P.S. And yes, I know that Gutenberg is misspelled.



You just fin...
 
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