What we’re reading online

A rolling feed of our favourite literary resources.

Source: NYT BooksPublished on 2019-11-18
Season 3 has finally arrived. Here’s some supplemental reading.
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-11-18
In a piece by Rebecca Mead, the London-based grime rapper, who also stars in the Netflix drama “Top Boy,” reflects on British slang, his sixth album, and how to get into the mind of a criminal.
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-11-18
Poetry by Edward Hirsch: “You weren’t sure why / morning halted / up and down the street.”
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-11-18
On a new album from the charismatic figurehead of the energetic trio Ratking, the mythology of youth collides with reality, Carrie Battan writes. 
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-11-18
Philip Deloria on massacres, myths, and the making of the great November holiday.
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-11-18
A free, twice-weekly online puzzle, with answers and clues that exhibit the wit and intelligence of the magazine.
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-11-18
Casey Cep on William Monroe Trotter, who rejected the view that racial equality could come in stages.
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-11-18
The mainstreaming of natural wines has brought niche winemakers capital and celebrity, as well as questions about their personalities and politics, Rachel Monroe writes.
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-11-18
Jennifer Aniston and Steve Carell’s depiction of a #MeToo crisis is a pricey, glum misfire, while Emily Dickinson’s makeover is a sweet and original surprise, Emily Nussbaum writes.
 
Source: New Yorker / CulturePublished on 2019-11-18
Personal History by Adam Shatz: For a bullied kid with weight issues, haute cuisine provided an escape.
 
Source: New Yorker / Books & FictionPublished on 2019-11-18
Casey Cep on William Monroe Trotter, who rejected the view that racial equality could come in stages.
 
Source: New Yorker / Books & FictionPublished on 2019-11-18
“Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister,” “The Season,” “The Factory,” and “Atopia.”
 
Source: New Yorker / Books & FictionPublished on 2019-11-18
Fiction by John Edgar Wideman: “Our silences really, not our voices, engaged in conversation. Though I hear you singing. Softly. Clearly.”
 
Source: Guardian BooksPublished on 2019-11-18
A heart treatment provides the inspiration for a lyric as precise as the procedure it reflects on

Ablation

Inside the Northern General
they’re trying to burn away
a small piece of your heart.

Continue reading...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-11-18
It is a truth universally acknowledged that an Austen heroine must learn a valuable lesson. Emma Woodhouse must learn not to meddle in others’ romantic lives (and, apparently, that her ideal life partner is a much older man who has been eyeing her since she was a child). Elizabeth Bennett relinquishes her early, unflattering notions of Fitzwilliam Darcy—not that he did much to recommen...
 
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