What we’re reading online

A rolling feed of our favourite literary resources.

Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-05-22
Of course you can drink Bombay Sapphire straight from the bottle, with a shotglass of tonic water on the side, or indulge in a bag of Hershey’s Kisses (as much fun for your thumbs as texting), or scoop peanut butter straight from the jar with your finger, which will also beneficially coat your stomach in advance of Excedrin PM., if not CBD. But think a bit more—here’s the word of...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-05-22
Of all the pleasures of speculative fiction, I may have missed world-building the most.

Any compelling speculative world resembles ours enough to fascinate, but is also different enough to be visionary. Masters of the genre—like Margaret Atwood or Ursula K. Le Guin—situate their most enduring works in singular places. In The Handmaid’s Tale, the unforgettable suffer...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-05-22
The first time I workshopped a story at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop was a wholly violent experience, the aftershocks of which still pulse through my life. I had heard rumors both about the teacher and about the place in general. Before I came to the Writers’ Workshop, I was living in Wisconsin, studying science. A friend of mine there was a graduate of the workshop from ten years back, ...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-05-22
I’ve always felt it was the job of a good novel to dig in the dirt, which may be why the best ones always seemed to me to be the ones about women who were angry, sad, or just plain bad: women made reckless by ennui, women who resisted all the way, who failed to fit themselves to the shape of a husband’s thumb. I can’t understand picking up a book in search of someone unobjectiona...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-05-22
I.
You Have to Trust a City That Can Make “Ain’t it Hard Just to Live?” Sound Beautiful

I came to Baltimore almost a year ago, happily, but with half a lifetime’s worth of suspicion: I grew up in and outside of D.C., where our nearest neighbor city was sometimes the butt of dismissive jokes, where you know how Baltimore people are could be considered suffici...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-05-22
A Thursday afternoon in the middle of January in a midwestern town is, at best, bleak. The sterile fields, covered with snow, stretch for miles in every direction. Occasionally, a farmer will leave a tractor or a thresher standing in the barnyard, as if in defiance of the laws of nature. These are oversights, however, because the people of Iowa understand that January is essentially a month of hib...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-05-22
On August 10th, 1915, a 27-year-old signals officer was shot through the head by a Turkish sniper. He was in the Dardanelles as part of Winston Churchill’s daring, perhaps foolhardy, plan to open a new front in the war. The Ottoman Empire had joined Germany and Austria-Hungary months before, widening the conflict even further. What became known as the Battle of Gallipoli was a disaster, fail...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-05-22
Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin’s classic autobiography, The Making of a Southerner (1946) propelled white southern self-writing away from moonlight-and-magnolias and toward searing regional critique. Katharine was the youngest of three remarkable sisters who were born into a family of former slaveholders and taught to venerate the Confederacy and preserve white supremacy at all costs. Elizabeth, t...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-05-22
On this week’s Reading Women, Autumn and Kendra talk with Angie Kim about her new book Miracle Creek, which is out now from Sarah Crichton Books.



From the episode

Autumn Privett: Can you talk about this concept of being a bad mother that shows up in the book?

Angie Kim: I have this huge thing about how we, as a society, expect women to be Good...
 
Source: Literary HubPublished on 2019-05-22
Saskia Vogel is the guest on this week’s Otherppl. Her debut novel, Permission, is available from Coach House Books. Vogel was born and raised in Los Angeles and now lives in its sister city, Berlin, where she works as a writer and Swedish-to-English literary translator.

Previously she worked as Granta magazine’s global publicist and as an editor at the AVN Media Network, w...
 
Source: Paul McVeighPublished on 2019-05-22
James Ellroy finally has happiness in his sightsTweets by @paul_mc_veigh
 
Source: Guardian BooksPublished on 2019-05-22
A young man and his cross-dressing friend flee Albania, in a devastating story shot through with subversive humourPajtim Statovci was born in Kosovo in 1990; his family emigrated to Finland just as the genocidal assault on Bosnia began, and later Kosovo. A Finnish-language writer of Kosovan-Albanian heritage, Statovci works at a fertile imaginative confluence that allows him the multiple perspecti...
 
Source: Guardian BooksPublished on 2019-05-22
The demon dog behind LA Confidential, American Tabloid, The Black Dahlia and new thriller This Storm will be answering your questions on Monday 27 May at 3pm BST

3.21pm BST

I’m very pleased to say that the demon dog himself, James Ellroy, will be joining us for a webchat on Monday 27 May at 3pm BST.

This is a great opportunity to put a question to one of the...
 
Source: The RumpusPublished on 2019-05-22
When we overlook writing as an act of labor, we tend to forget the hard work that goes into it, the long periods of time it might take, and the toll it takes on the body and mind. For Jason Allen, author of the forthcoming The East End (Park Row/HarperCollins Books), the work behind this debut novel meant years of intense dedication, balancing his time spent writing with his studies and his teachi...
 
Source: Guardian BooksPublished on 2019-05-22
When Trump took office, sales of Nineteen Eighty-Four increased by 9,500%. This astute study locates the origins of the novel and traces its life within pop culture

Most Orwell biography is, at heart, an exercise in teleology: a reverse journey through his life and times that begins with the achievement of Nineteen Eighty-Four and then works backwards, in an attempt to establish exactly...
 
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